Women Innovators: Where’s Your Roar?

Why is it that the vast majority of stories about inventors and creators are about men?  I know I am not alone.  I think being female has greatly contributed to helping me carve out a successful career in innovation. I certainly have an innate knowledge of the primary users of everyday household products. Women drive over 80% of the consumer economy in the United States.

According to The Female Brain by Dr. Louann Brizendine, my hippocampus is larger than that in men. This is the part of the brain that never forgets a fight, a romantic encounter or a tender moment.  An elephant-never-forgets type of memory allows me to recall experiences and observations more effectively, which is very good for seeing connections, or as I call them, Red Threads, to form new ideas.

So why is it that there are virtually no women who have written a book (other than mine due out this month) to help businesses and entrepreneurs develop ideas for innovation?  Plug the word “innovation” into Amazon and of the top 100 hits, you’ll find just two books written by women:  Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature by Janine M. Benyus and out-of-print (with no description) Innovation by Alexandra Papadakis.

It doesn’t look much better when you put “creative thinking “ into the Amazon search: women wrote only seven books out of one hundred.  Yes, that’s just 7%.  And in the advertising profession, which targets the vast majority of its communications towards women, just 3% of its creative directors are women.

Women are highly creative and inventive.  We spend our days solving problems in all sorts of unique ways; the endless balancing act among family, career and household responsibilities.  We have high executive function for both multi-tasking and extraordinary focus.  We often don’t broadcast it.  As Anna Fels wrote in a 2004 article in the Harvard Business Review and in her book Necessary Dreams:  women are totally capable of mastery, they struggle with the recognition. They don’t like to call attention to themselves.

I am a board member of the organization Count Me In.  We help women entrepreneurs grow their businesses. The single biggest obstacle to their success, which may surprise you, is the women themselves. What holds these companies back is the owner’s lack of confidence, inability to think big enough and discomfort with talking about money.  These are emotional factors that plague women and hinder our power to take hold of economic potential.  According to the Center for Women’s Business Research, there is approximately the same number of firms owned by each gender, but only 3% of women-owned companies have revenues of $1 million or more compared with 6% of men-owned businesses.

Self-esteem typically starts its decline in girls as young as nine years old and this is when the crisis of creativity for business begins.  We need to instill creative passion and confidence, and the belief that problem-solving at any level is meaningful and worth sharing.  We need to help young women get out of their own way, to push through fear and doubt.

Innovation only survives when people believe in their own ideas. Believing in your creativity or a new idea requires the ability to face fears and push ahead.  It is all about confidence and passion.  Without these qualities it is difficult to execute ideas.  Belief in yourself is what motivates you to persevere.  That’s why women aren’t out there in great enough numbers.

I know how powerful women’s ideas can be, having been privileged to work with some incredibly talented women.  Every woman’s head can be overflowing with innovative concepts.  We all have the power to design and develop thoughts into brilliant and practical innovations for everyday living. You just need a little confidence and the right tools.  Trust in your ideas and yourself.  Get out of your own way. Roar and you will be heard.

 

 

  • http://twitter.com/kathyjordan Kathy Jordan

    Thanks so much for this post-eagerly await your book. Recently I was prepping a presentation on creativity for leaders and had to look awhile to come up with an example of innovation that was a result of seeing fresh connections. I found this story about Julie Corbett, founder of Ecologic Brands. http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2012-10-25/julie-corbett-bottles-inspired-by-the-iphone.

    • RTThinking

      Thank you for the article. Actually most innovations are the result of seeing fresh connections. That’s what insight is all about. I hope you’ll find my book helps you do it easily. It’s on sale now so just click on the right. More important, I really would like to know what you think about it after reading. That’s a dialogue I hope we will have.

  • http://twitter.com/kathyjordan Kathy Jordan

    One other thought: Looking for a day soon when you write a post titled “Women Entrepreneurs: Hear Them Roar” :-)

    • RTThinking

      At Count Me In, we work on that every day. Imagine only 3% of women’s businesses achieve over $1MM revenue versus 6% of men’s, so your point is well taken. More needs to be said. Watch this space in the future.

  • http://spinsucks.com Gini Dietrich

    And…there is another issue at play. Danica Patrick just won first pole in the Daytona 500. Not only is she the best woman racer, she’s the best racer. But what were people saying in their tweets, Facebook updates, an in person? They were making jokes about her and a “pole” (as in stripper.

    We have a long, long way to go. This stuff infuriates me.

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